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Terrorist Front Group Makes Disturbing Move Against Gun Shop Owner Who Banned Muslims

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Last week, the Florida chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, a known terrorist front group, filed a federal lawsuit against a Florida gun store owner who declared his store to be a “Muslim-free zone.”

Andrew Hallinan, the owner of Florida Gun Supply, reportedly implemented the policy in the wake of the most recent terrorist attack, in which Islamic radical Muhammad Youssef Abdulazeez opened fire on two separate military installations in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

“I have a moral and legal responsibility to ensure the safety of all patriots in my community,” he announced in a video uploaded to YouTube. “I will not arm and train those who wish to do harm to my fellow patriots.”

However, CAIR-FL executive director Hassan Shibly argued to reporters that Hallinan was engaging in clear-cut discrimination and blatant “Islamophobia.”

Shibly also defended his group’s lawsuit on the basis that Hallinan had “refused to reconsider his position,” “refused to reconsider to be educated,” “refused to engage [the Muslim]community” and “refused to respect American law.”

And yes, a Muslim tied to terrorism tried to lecture American patriot Andrew Hallinan on American law.

The part about refusing to engage with Muslims was in reference to Hallinan’s decision not to meet and train Shilby. Apparently, Hallinan considered doing as much but then changed his mind after his customers warned him that CAIR is considered by the United Arab Emirates to be a terrorist group. More

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