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College Admissions Leader Forced To Apologize For Saying This

College Admissions Leader Forced To Apologize For Saying This

“All Lives Matter”

He then had to apologize a second time for not saying “black lives matter” in his initial apology.

College Fix:

You can think that all lives matter – you just can’t say it.

The outgoing president of the National Association for College Admission Counseling faced an uproar after he spoke the forbidden phrase of solidarity with humanity, regardless of a person’s race or creed, at the group’s conference Thursday.

Inside Higher Ed reports that Phillip Trout’s initial apology statement did not include the talismanic phrase “black lives matter.” He simply apologized for having “offended and hurt so many people” with words that are “not right,” and promised the association’s board would spend more time “addressing issues of race and human relations.”

Apparently the social-media grousing against Trout (much of it private on Facebook) did not subside with that apology. By Saturday, when Trout handed the baton to incoming President Nancy Beane, he issued a second apology from the stage:

“At Thursday’s opening general session, I wanted to acknowledge all the violence occurring in our communities along with a statement of sympathy and solidarity for all those affected that should have used the words ‘Black Lives Matter,’ ” Trout said. “I regret that my insensitive statement caused hurt and offense and that the impact of my message of inclusion and respect actually had the opposite effect. I am sorry to have hurt the feelings of so many people, and I offer you my sincerest apology.

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