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Freddie Gray Pastor ➠ No Justice, No Peace! Scarborough ➠ No One Wanted Violence

Freddie Gray Pastor ➠ No Justice, No Peace! Scarborough ➠ No One Wanted Violence

Freddie Gray Pastor: No Justice, No Peace! Scarborough: No One Wanted Violence

At yesterday’s funeral service for Freddie Gray, Pastor Jamal Bryant ended his eulogy by leading the congregation in a highly-charged chant of “No justice! No peace!”  Yet immediately after playing the clip of that moment, Joe Scarborough claimed that the riots that ensued were “something that no one inside that funeral could have ever have wanted.”

Had Scarborough listened to his own clip? If not, why not? If so, what does he think “no justice, no peace” means?

It’s true that later in the day, Bryant called for peace in the streets. But by then it was too late. Perhaps the pastor should have preached from the Book of Hosea: “They that sow the wind, shall reap the whirlwind.”

Note: The Associated Press reports that Bryant also told the funeral congregation that “somebody is going to have to pay” for Gray’s death.

JAMAL BRYANT: I came to tell Freddie Sr., I came to tell Freddie’s five sisters, don’t cry. And the reason why I want you not to cry is because Freddie’s death is not in vain. After this date, we’re going to keep on marching. After this date, we’ll keep demanding justice. No justice!

 

CONGREGATION: No peace!

 

BRYANT: No justice!

 

CONGREGATION: No peace!

 

BRYANT: No justice!

 

CONGREGATION: No peace!

 

JOE SCARBOROUGH: And yesterday, something that no one inside that funeral could have ever have wanted: riots breaking out across the city. 

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