Traci Johnson With Megyn Kelly ➠ Oklahoma Woman Who Was Nearly Beheaded ➠ Powerful Interview

Screenshot_7

Megyn Kelly Interviews Traci Johnson, Okla. Woman Who Was Nearly Beheaded

In a “Kelly File” exclusive interview, Megyn Kelly sat down with Traci Johnson, the Oklahoma woman who was nearly beheaded in a horrific 2014 workplace attack. Johnson, who worked on the production line at Vaughan Foods, walked Megyn through the entire harrowing experience.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBEktca7740?rel=0&w=640&h=480]

Johnson told Megyn that she had a couple of confrontations with Alton Nolen the day he attacked her and beheaded Colleen Hufford.

Trending: Here’s How Trump’s New Policy Will CUT WELFARE By 10.3 MILLION “Non-Citizens”

“I don’t like it when somebody’s not wanting to work and wanting to do their job,” Johnson stated of Nolen. “So I called him a spoiled brat and lazy. Then he kind of laughed a little bit and laughed that off.”

She said that while they were working, Nolen started making racist statements.

“He started being racist, [saying]‘I hate white people I beat white people up,'” Johnson told Megyn.

Johnson, along with two other coworkers who heard Nolen’s comments, went to the supervisor’s office to write a statement about what had just occurred.

Nolen confronted Johnson again, and as a result, was suspended and escorted out of the building.

What were you doing at the time of your coworker’s beheading? 

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5AU3OHL98dM?rel=0&w=640&h=480]

Later on, Johnson said she was changing her clothes in the locker room at Vaughan Foods when she heard someone screaming. More

Previous post

Farrakhan ➠ I Don't Get Debate Over Confederate Flag ➠ We Need To Put The American Flag Down

Next post

CNN’s Don Lemon ➠ We May Want To Rethink Slave Owner Thomas Jefferson ➠ VIDEO

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.